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Introduction
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Teaching
 
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Floor Work pt 1
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Floor Work pt 2
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Standing Work pt 1
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Standing Work pt 2
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Travelling Work
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Elements
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Interviews
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Credits
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Title
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Travelling Work
Floor work and standing/centre-work flow into the attainment of control, in order to move in space. The qualities of the transitional movements between each step are paramount to the overarching artistic quality.
The first movement across the floor goes back to the simplest and yet most complex step for the dance artist – the walk – bringing into play the inevitability of the movement. The aim is to execute this with an artistic skill that transforms such an every day movement into something fascinating and intriguing.  
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From the simple walk – the travelling work develops, incorporating more complexity and drawing on all the physical and proprioceptive processes that the dancer has engaged with the moment they stepped into the studio.  
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Triplets Simple and with the Use of the Back – not only physically work the body but challenge the synergy between the dancer and the musician.
The simple triplet is a modification of the natural walk using the normal opposition of the body but varying the timing of the lower limbs into a three - count step. This re-organisation of a natural movement into a new code or path can confuse the brain. The 'normal action' gets lost and an artificial performance quality prevails. The dancer has to re-learn and re-connect the natural torque action of the body into the triplet step.
The more complex Triplet with the Use of the Back needs excellent control of the moving centre. The centre moves forward at a steady pace whilst at the same time the upper back muscles work in a syncopated rhythm – the back changes on the 'and' count preceding the forward step of the legs, ' All the work has to happen in between the counts; the 'one' is the finish of the movement.' (Cohan)
 
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Travelling Spiral Step – Uses the spiral action in both spatial floor pattern and within the body demanding confident direction and empowerment.
This is a beautiful and deceivingly difficult sequence that unites all the images and understanding gained from the floor and centre work such as; spirals, curves, torque, the drive through of the pelvis, qualitative sensations of listening to the spine and sensing the shift of air. I imagine the spine weaving right through the centre core of the body with its snake like fluid articulation and the arms and legs moving from the back and pelvis; connected to a moving centre yet with maximum equality of space, so no one aspect is more important than another.
This is a good example of where the preparatory exercise of the Spiral walks using the Back/Shifting Body Weight sequence executed in the centre work (which was the culmination and development of the floor-work) now extends into the Travelling Spiral Step and moving through space.
 
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Jumpsto feel the sensation of being suspended in the air, achieving a moment of breath – a moment of artistic freedom. In order to capture that moment of suspension in the air it is important to ensure that all the preparatory movements have taken place. The 'suspended moment' happens in the space between the near top of the ascent and the ultimate height. So the dancer needs to attain the position just before they hit the pinnacle of the jump; however that is only half of the process – the going up.
Achieving one good jump from anyone is possible but the dancer needs to execute many sequential jumps safely. So a mirror thought process is required to engage the dancer's awareness of the descent – the attainment of the correct focused attention during the landing phase will enable safe repetition.
'When you can be aware of the landing, then you will enjoy the elevation… the enjoyment of coming down' (Bob)
 
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End of Class Stretch Sequence – A sequence that brings the dancer back to a secure and grounded centred position. The dancer is aware of the gravitational pull of the earth and the required use of opposition to lift the body out of the feet and legs and allow the spine to extend to its full vertical length. The pitch over takes the torso out and away into a new hemisphere, the contraction from the pelvis carves out the inner space, and the sequential ripple through the spine follows this to the finish.
We (LCDT dancers) thought of this sequence not only as a grounding affirmation of the elements, but also as a thank-you to both tutor (Bob) and musician.
 
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What is paramount is that the physical technique class has a logical approach so that its aim of creating a somatically aware dance artist is accomplished.

The Concept of Centre – This is the fundamental principle that encompasses Bob's teaching method.

The Floor-work – focuses the breath and attention of the dancer to their physical centre. Each exercise demands conscious engagement to the progressively expanding challenges, extending the movements from the core – outwards into the limbs, up through the spine, the torso and into the head.

The Centre/Standing Work – challenges the control of centre with different stresses and movement possibilities.

Travelling/ Moving in Space – push the boundaries further to reach a place where movement flows exquisitely from a controlled centre – to the becoming of a dance artist with the skill to physically articulate a silent creative universal language.

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